30 March 2008

Quote of the Week

In this week's issue of The Church Times, there is a subscribers' only Interview with Philip Yancey where Yancey reminds us: 'If it doesn't sound like good news, it isn't the gospel'.

I'm fairly certain that I remember Yancey saying this in one if his books, but I think it's a sentiment worth repeating and revisiting. Quoting from the interview:
Jesus said the truth shall set you free, and he came to give life in all its fullness. If it doesn't sound like good news, it's not the gospel. If it's not setting you free and enlarging life, then it's not Jesus's message.
Your starter for six: How many 'Christian messages' (sic) not only totally fail to set people free but narrow our lives and enslave us?

3 comments:

Doorman-Priest said...

Oh, don't start me off on that one Pam...........

Anonymous said...

How about humans having a limited understanding of what truly set us free or not so that what we observe as not setting us free truly sets us free? To me getting set free from the judgement of sin for eternal life AND having a relationship with God who is our Father and experience His blessings and at the same time be obedient to Him IS being free? Whether or not it sounds like being free or not doesn't change the fact that this sets us free since God's Word says that it does. Man, it makes sense that since our understanding of what is "good and evil" is flawed that we would truly understand whats "set's us free". Man, we know that some teenagers believe they "aren't free" because they aren't living on their own yet we don't say that it is wrong to have parents protect their children by having them stay under their house let alone have boundaries. The same goes for the Good News when the relationship is also between Father and His children. For me so a parent to his children, so it is for a Parent to His children. If you get my drift. dh

Dave Faulkner said...

And the good news is also that the Yancey interview is no longer subscriber-only. I logged this quotation when I first read it here, and I'm quoting it in tomorrow's sermon. Thanks for the link!